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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
. afghanistan, there's no guarantee of the future. these are -- the foreign policy record, especially as it relates to terrorism, is not much of a record. >> and caryn, you've been covering the foreign policy as well as the domestic policy. this "60 minutes" interview, the joint interview, was pretty extraordinary on the face of it, but as we enter this last week of hillary clinton's tenure, the president is basically saying, you know, thank you, thank you, thank you for everything you've done. >> yeah. and she has been i think in many ways -- there are not a lot of sort of big monumental tangible accomplishments of her tenure as secretary of state. in many ways she was successful as much because of what she represented, but the history of second terms is that foreign policy becomes much more important, that presidents travel more, that they often engage more with the rest of the world, and i think that given the set of events we're looking at overseas, that is very likely to be the case of president obama's second term. foreign policy almost wasn't even almost mentioned in this elect
as the front pages of the paper do you think that is the foreign policy legacy of his first term? >> i think it is. you can't really point to any successes. you heard him in that little sound bite saying we are going to lead. he has been saying the tied of war is receding. it's not reseeding. the tied of war is increasing in all kinds of places like west africa where it hadn't been. the dominance of the united states in the region ever since kissinger is receding. it is the absence of american influence and power which is creating a vacuum into which the jihadists are coming. that's the most important resistance of insurgents is it is in places where we didn't expect it like north africa. it is as if there were jihadists regimes or attacks in central america. that's now the europeans miss it. the number one issue is iran. the prime minister re-elected on tuesday say at the u.n. last year that in spring and summereh a point of no return at which he was announcing israel would have to act. i think obama is going to have to face that either to prevent the israelis in some way or to give a red l
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
, our foreign policy was not going to be defined solely by iraq; that we were going to be vigilant about terrorism, but we were going to make sure that we deployed all elements of american power-- diplomacy, our economic and cultural and social capital-- in order to bring about the kinds of international solutions that we wanted to see. i had confidence that hillary could do that. and, you know, one of the things that i will always be grateful for is... yeah, it wasn't just that she and i had to integrate. i mean, we had bob gates, who was a holdover from the bush administration, you know, leon panetta to take over the c.i.a., and so we had a lot of very strong personalities around the table. you know, i think one of the things that hillary did was establish a standard in terms of professionalism and teamwork in our cabinet, in our foreign policy making that said "we're going to have an open discussion, we're going to push each other hard; there are going to be times where we have some vigorous disagreements. once the president makes a decision, though, we're going to go out there and ex
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
that bigger question about putting and placing benghazi within the scope of a broader failure of foreign policy. and that's going to have to be what they're going to do if they're going to talk about chuck hagel. highlight the obama failure in this area and that chuck hagel is going to be a yes man for that strategy. if they're not able to do that in a hearing like this, they've been pressing for for months, it does not bowed wede for her-- >> and what about her state and benghazi now a negative concerns and arms control deal with russia, you were not enamored of, i recall. overall, what's her legacy? >> she's one of the most traveled secretary of state and diplomacy to her credit well. and sort of a famous figure who went to many countries. in terms of her influence on obama policy or much of any sort of achievements, it's impossible to me to point to anything and what's more remarkable about the hearings, that she sounded very hawkish and america must lead in north afri africa, we must halt the spreading-- >> you can't have a vacuum, but that's the policy that the administration has be
are subscribers and readers which we've carried out in collaboration with foreign policy and lots of other conferences and publications around south asian affairs. so anyway, we're all very pleased to have this occasion to bring us together, and the purpose today is to have a very serious discussion about the ideas and subjects that are in the book and that are, obviously, still alive as dilemmas for american foreign policy. so let me introduce peter and welcome him to the podium. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, steve, and thank you for all of you coming today and for c-span for covering this. steve was instrumental in making this whole project happen, so i'm very grateful to him. thank you, also, to oxford university press which published the book and did, i think, a fine job in terms of presenting the material. thank you, also, to my co-editor, katherine, and thanks also to people here at the foundation, brian fishman, patrick doherty, jennifer roland and andrew lev witch who were also involved in making the book possible. as steve indicated, the reason we felt this project was neces
hearing these. >> if she wants this job, it will be interesting. on foreign policy, president obama defending himself from critics who say the u.s. has not been aggressive enough in using american power abroad. >>> well, moammar gadhafi probably does not agree with that assessment, or at least if he were around he would not agree with that assessment. when it comes to egypt, if it had not been for the leadership we showed, you might have seen a different outcome there. but also understanding that we do nobody a service when we leap before we look. here is a classic example of where our involvement, we want to make sure that not only does it enhance u.s. security but also that it is doing right by the people of syria and neighbors like israel that are going to be profoundly affected by it. and so it's true sometimes that we don't just shoot from the hip. >>> secretary clinton's last day at the state department will be this friday. >>> we have new developments on immigration reform. a bipartisan group of eight senators say they've reached an agreement on sweeping legislation that incl
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
,000 front line jobs to women in the military. "outfront" tonight, rosa brooks, a columnist for foreign policy and has worked in the pentagon under the obama administration and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush and critter for us. right now, 40% of active duty are women. this could be hundreds of thousand of jobs suddenly would be open to women. am i right in saying this is hublgly significant? >> it's absolutely enormous. the one thing i would say though, the it's not that we don't have women in combat positions. we have women who are ineligible under the former policy, but there really isn't any front line in today's wars. fighting heroically in combat, women who have died in combat. this change just recognizes what's already a reality, frankly. >> david, please be blunt. i know what you have to say is, might offend some people, but this is important. why do you think women in combat is not a good idea? >> i think we need to stress, this is quite an abstract notion. the number of women who will speak and equally is likely to be quite low, but of those who do, i think
for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report," we will look at the channels awaiting senator kerry if as expected he is confirmed next week. kerry faced mostly friendly questioning during today's session. the current secretary of state is criticized for a lack of consistency in her statements wednesday about last year's libya terror attack. we'll go over some of the inconsistencies tonight. brit hume will have analysis of clinton's tenure. wheels are in motion for women to serve on the front line of combat position. the change was officially announced today. does president obama really want to annihilate the republican party in "special report" from washington starts at 6:00 eastern. now back to new york and my colleagues with "the five." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: disgusting. >> dana: you're disgusting. >> greg: that is a sick song. >> dana: can i do my segment? we're going to talk about you. soda ban about to go in effect in new york city but has new opposition that used to be for it. they were
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
on guns and foreign policy, how can you call that the far left? >> let me put it this way, the fact of the matter is this is going to be politically very problematic for harry reid because for the constituency he represents in the senate, they're not going to be able to get a lot of things that the president wants done because it's too far to the left of him. for example, on gun control, that's going to be very problematic for -- >> can i get back to shrummy? does it bother you your opinions are generally acceptable or do you prefer to be a maverick? >> i've been waiting for the country to come around. i thought it would. i think barack obama has done a brilliant job. i would say to john he keeps talking about the problems in the red states. the red states are becoming a shrinking part of america. the one thing boehner said that is true is the republican party is annihilating itself in terms of being able to win the presidency. because they are in a demographic death spiral with women, with hispanics, with african-americans, with young people, with gays. what happened with ronald re
state department and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're actually considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: he is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate -- >> clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> su
what they think about it and all the power vacuums created by our foreign policy lately are not clearly prepared to keep the peace when we get involved in the arab spring. my point to mr. nixon this isn't the nobel gee we think you are pretty swell award it should go to the christian and muslim leaders in nigeria who are working to bridge the police there. political dissidents in cuba and russia. people doing real on-the-groundwork. so lazy to give it to hillary clinton. just lazy. >> garland, what do you think. >> if the republicans had v. spent one/1,000th of the energy benghazi thinkingalling l figuring out whether there was weapons of mass destruction in iraq as opposed to four in benghazi. >> i do want to bring in, i threw this out in the twitter world in the facebook world and we got a huge response. people very opinionated about whether or not this should happen. one of those responses, mike, sanveri if alfred nobel knew how politicized his peace prize had become he would be rolling in his grave the entire panel has become a farce. s is it too politicized, mike? >> it's almost as
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
's foreign policy. the foreign policy is what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? >> brian: what do you say to people who say hue bark wasn't a benevolent dictator even though he was good to us. should we have not been giving egypt aid all those years? >> we were not interfering with the internal situation in these countries, but mubarak had agreements with this country. this administration throws our allies under the bus. they've done it with the northern alliance that fought the taliban in afghanistan. they did it with poland. we'd deal with them for defensive weapons. they've done it repeatedly and as a west african told me when i was over there a couple of years ago, he said, we were so excited when you elected a black president. but please, tell people in washington stop getting weaker. the world sees you getting weaker! don't do that. you put us in jeopardy. we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending je
fighter jets to egypt. here is louie gohmert on "fox & friends." this administration's foreign policy. the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending jets and tanks to a man who a leader whose only two enemies he he said in the past are israel and the united states are resupplying our enemies with the means to fight us. the founder and president of the amaker islamic forum and philosophy. thanks for being on the show. >> thanks, clayton for having me. >> if you listen to the congressman. he makes it sound as if egypt is our sworn enemy right now. is that the case? and, if so, why are we sending them the numbers i see 16 f-16s and 200 abraham's tanks by the end of the year? >> >> it's pretty horrifying clayton that we are doing. this and goes beyond the weaponry this is about supporting ideology sworn against the united states, against the west, ag
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
a foreign policy that can doing development as well as diplomacy that can reach out to women's groups, to youth, to entrepreneurs, to religious groups. that's the softer side. but it's also the smart side. and it's not john kerry's natural bailiwick, but it's very important that he build on that legacy. >> i take it that state department will be much different under kerry. and marie slaughter, thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> a woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend more than 20 times is claiming self-defense. it's one of the hottest trials going on right now. we'll dig deeper on the jodi arias trial with hln's jane velez-mitchell just ahead. >> one day when he drove home from a little league game, i saw a homeless man with a cardboard sign that said "need a meal." so i told my mom i wanted to do something. >> will larsy is a 9-year-old child. i hesitate to call him child. i think he's in a category of his own. as a 7-year-old, he decided he was going to take on this issue of hunger. >> welcome to frogs. >> my group is called frogs and it means friends reaching o
spending. this has been a big foreign policy week in washington. and i'm wondering, given what we've learned about al qaeda and its resurgence in north africa and just defense posture globally, david, do you have a sense of what ryan is thinking about defense spending these days? >> no, i don't, particularly with regard to ryan, but i think it's such an important point, gene, because the threat from northern africa alone, listen to secretary clinton's testimony beyond what went into the benghazi attack or what information was missed. the need to fortify our missions and installations and consulates and embassies around the globe. and to the extent that we're going to have an aggressive posture to deal with an al qaeda 3.0 around the globe or failing states, if that comes to pass in afghanistan, there are real concerns that a lot of people have about the united states right now. to say nothing of all of the costs related to our returning soldiers and the sort of care that they're going to need. >> you know, what's so fascinating, steve rattner, talking about the debate, i'm actuall
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)